Clear liquid diet general anesthesia intubation

By | October 14, 2020

clear liquid diet general anesthesia intubation

Advanced Search. Clear RCTs diet that preoperative on gastric pH in elective. Evaluating ranitidine, pantoprazole and placebo antacids e. An Intubation comparing liquid light. Preoperative fasting period is the prescribed time prior to any h before anesthesia procedure with anaesthesia, regional anaesthesia or sedation, general oral intake of liquids or solids are not allowed. .

Preoperative fasting period is the prescribed time prior to any procedure done either under general anaesthesia, regional anaesthesia or sedation, when oral intake of liquids or solids are not allowed. This mandatory fasting is a safety precaution that helps to protect from pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents which may occur any time during anaesthesia. We searched PUBMED for English language articles using keywords including child, paediatric, anaesthesia, fasting, preoperative, gastric emptying. We also hand searched references from relevant review articles and major society guidelines. Current guidelines recommend fasting duration of 4 hours for breastmilk, 6 hours for milk and light meals and 8 hours for fatty meals. While fluids can be started almost immediately, the introduction of solids should be done more cautiously. This occurs as a result of loss of protective airway reflexes and regurgitation.

While preparing for my recent knee surgery I was given a lot of instructions. Where to park, how to dress, when to arrive, what to bring and even what not to eat and drink. Like many surgical patients, I was given a time after which I was no longer allowed to eat and a different time after which I was not allowed to drink clear fluids. Being a Diet Coke lover, I immediately wondered what it is about brown, opaque Diet Coke that makes it not OK to consume close to surgery. What is it about clear, colourless Sprite that makes it fine? As a more direct comparison, why would white grape juice be OK but not purple grape juice? I wondered if somehow the dyes in the drinks could interfere with surgical imaging or complicate emergency procedures I could need like intubation. Maybe the colourings could affect my mouth, stomach or urine in a way that made surgery more difficult somehow. Once you realize the reasoning behind clear-fluid diets for surgical patients, it becomes obvious that non-cloudy is what doctors mean.

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